Field Trips and Guided Walks

on

The Wildflowers and Medicinal Plants

of

Scotland



The medicinal value of our native flora is a heritage that goes back to the middle ages. The British Isles are very rich in wildflowers and medicinal plants. Many of these are described in the Medieval Texts and in later centuries by renowned herbalists like Culpepper.  

 

The field-trips outlined below encompass several different plant habitats:

Mixed coastal terrain

Links

Managed pasture

Fallow pasture

Managed mixed woodland

Woodland reserve

Managed coniferous woodland

Upper hill pasture

Upper hill reserve

Marshland

 

Field trips and guided walks run from April - September.

 

Our base is at the southern gateway to the Fife Coastal Path. Details are available from Battery House B&B - www.stayhere.uk.com

Visitors are welcome to browse our collection of botanical, herbal and homeopathic reference texts. Those who are formally studying on courses in medical herbalism or homeopathy, will find everything here that they need for a peaceful and productive sabbatical.

From here it is only five minutes walk to the Carlingnose Reserve. Here calcareous deposits have been specifically designated for the promulgation of coastal wildflower species.


 

  Please note that we do not permit the picking or gathering of wild plants. These walks encourage the study of habitat and taxonomy and are of interest to artists, wildlife photographers, botanists, herbalists, homeopaths and members of the general public - in fact anyone wishing to know more about our native flora.

 

 Early flowering woodland plants are best found from the end of March in mixed woodland (5m or 20m from base).  
 Fungi can be found in most terrains, but the richest selections are to be found in mixed woodland in September (15m from base).  
 Many of the coastal wildflowers have a long flowering season, but the greatest variety can be found in May and June. (Fine walks 1m, 5m, 30m, 40m from base)  
 

The flowering times of heathers extends from June, (ling) to September (bell heathers).(Good moorland and Upper Hill-land walks range from 16m to 45m from base).

 
 The fruiting time for Crataegus, Prunus spinosa, Rosa cana, Fragaria etc., is also a good time for encountering fungi of many varieties.  
 

Early flowering woodland plants are best found from the end of March in mixed woodland (5m or 20m from base). Fungi can be found in most terrains, but the richest selections are to be found in mixed woodland in September (15m from base).

Many of the coastal wildflowers have a long flowering season, but the greatest variety can be found in May and June. (Fine walks 1m, 5m, 30m, 40m from base).

The flowering times of heathers extends from June, (ling) to September (bell heathers).

(Good moorland and Upper Hill-land walks range from 16m to 45m from base).

The fruiting time for Crataegus, Prunus spinosa, Rosa cana, Fragaria etc., is also a good time for encountering fungi of many varieties.

For further details of accommodation and field trips contact: lauramalcolm@uku.co.uk


Gallery of Scottish Wild Flowers (See also: Gallery of Medicinal Plants)

 Bindweed  Trifid bur-marigold  Hare bell  
 Spur valerian
Common mouse ear
 Spring beauty Early scurvy grassCommon spotted orchid
 Great Willow-herb  Bird's-foot Trefoil  Yellow pimpernel Bluebell
Mouse-earHawkweed  Broad-leaved Willow-herb  Goose grass Cleavers Sticky willie  Honeysuckle